Lost and found Goya paintings

Hannibal the Conqueror viewing Italy from the Alps for the first time

Hannibal the Conqueror viewing Italy from the Alps for the first time, 1770

An unknown painting by Goya was discovered in a secluded palace in Spain in 1993. This painting, Hannibal the Conqueror viewing Italy from the Alps for the first time, was painted in 1770 when Goya was living in Rome preparing for a painting competition sponsored by the Academy of Fine Arts in city of Parma.

Down They Come ( also called Witches and Women), 1812-29

Down They Come ( also called Witches and Women), 1812-29

The Constable Lampinos Stitched Inside a Dead Horse, 1812-29

The Constable Lampinos Stitched Inside a Dead Horse, 1812-29

Repentance, 1812-29

Repentance, 1812-29

In May 27, 2008 a London based newspaper, The Telegraph, announced that a set of three sketches by Goya were found after being lost for over 130 years. The sketches were last recorded at an 1877 auction in Paris. These Goya works were presumed lost when they came to light recently in a private Swiss collection. They are from Goya's private albums and were split up after his death. The pages from these albums are now scattered all over the world. The three sketches are entitled:

1. Down They Come (also called Witches and Woman)
2. The Constable Lampinos Stitched Inside a Dead Horse
3. Repentance

The Immaculate Virgin, circa 1781

The Immaculate Virgin, circa 1781

On October 11, 2004, a British newspaper, The Guardian, announced that an unknown work by Goya was discovered in Milaga, Spain. The art restorer, Paulino Gimenez, was working on the painting when he uncovered elements undeniably characteristic of Goya's work. Mr. Gimenez is quoted as saying, "We found hidden faces typical of Goya." This painting, entitled The Immaculate Virgin, contains similarities to other Goya's of the same period, particularly hidden images of a cat. The subject matter of the oil painting is the Virgin Mary standing on a cloud with her arms outstretched. X-rays revealed a cat hidden in a cloud below the Virgin's feet. This painting had been attributed to Mariano Salvador Maella who had worked with Goya as a court painter of Carlos IV and is said to be from around 1781.

Two paintings believed to be by Goya were discovered at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts on April 22. 1911. They were discovered by Valerian Von Loga who was a curator of the Berlin Museum and art connoisseur of Germany. Loga had traveled to America to study Spanish art. The works by Goya are believed to be portraits. The identity of one of the portraits is unknown, but the name, "Francis O. Govay Lucientes" is inscribed underneath the other. The paintings are said to be from 1769.

 

 

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